DeadlySinsOfRealEstate
3 deadly sins of real estate
Kevin Juliano, e-PRO
Jan 4, 2016
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Leigh Brown is a rockstar. It’s fitting she was the keynote speaker on Oct. 6, 2015 at the annual meeting for the REALTORS Association of York and Adams Counties (RAYAC). Why you ask? Being a rockstar was the theme for the annual Realtor® meeting. I was honored to join the association as a guest and learn about the seven deadly sins of real estate from a rockstar.

Leigh is a Realtor® based in North Carolina and is a national real estate trainer, coach and speaker. Her no-nonsense discussion of real estate cuts to the core of how she works with clients in her local market. Brown offered up seven (or so) deadly sins of real estate during her talk. I will highlight three here.

  1. Ego over substance. “If your business cards says you’re the number one agent in your town or area, stop it. Million dollar agent, stop it,” Brown said. Put yourself in the consumers’ shoes and be relatable. Define your value to your consumer and why it’s important to work with you versus using a statistic.
  2. Abandonment. “After you cash the check, real estate agents are leaving the clients in the dust,” Brown said. Consumers have spoken. The National Association of Realtors® Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers states that 80 percent of buyers and sellers would use the same Realtor® again. But only 20 percent actually do. Figure out how to keep your data organized and develop an outreach plan for past clients. However, Leigh warns that “clicking like on Facebook and Linkedin doesn’t count as connecting with people.” She suggested utilizing a service like Newsle to learn important life events of your professional contacts. Build a relationship that lasts beyond the transaction.
  3. Not asking questions. Brown said the market has shifted. Agents are not asking questions to be professional and find out the true reasons for the need to buy or sell. Brown continued, “Agents used to ask questions during the dark years of real estate. We need to have a better understanding of what our client really needs.” Leigh’s solution? Shut up. She recommended that agents listen twice as much as they talk. Utilizing an intake sheet can help agents formalize what they need ask every consumer.

Do you agree with these three deadly sins of real estate?